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Medicated

Discussion in 'General Support and Advice' started by Yeahyeah2, Aug 9, 2018.

  1. Yeahyeah2

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    So I've been taking medication for depression and anxiety for a year now but I don't want to keep taking it. Yes, it helped me and I feel a bit better with it but that's the thing, I don't want to depend on it. There were times when I stopped taking it because I didn't buy it or something and after 3 days I started feeling dizzy or bad or I don't know how to describe it, and that I don't want. I don't think I want to go to a therapist because I don't want to talk me and such but I'd like to stop taking the medication and that my psychiatrist doesn't want to send me to a therapist (like every time I see him, he always suggest me to go to a therapist).
    Does anyone ever stopped taking medication and didn't feel bad after that?
     
  2. PatrickUK

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    It would be a really bad idea to come off the medication without your psychiatrists support and I have to be honest and tell you that he's unlikely to support such a decision if you are not engaging with the idea of therapy.

    If you agree to therapy he may look at reducing the dosage and withdrawing altogether if you show signs of progress, but if you go against his advice I can't see that happening at all.

    Based on what I've read on this forum, I think your psychiatrist is absolutely correct in suggesting therapy. You may not like the idea, but it's the only way you are likely to confront and fully address the circling issues you have mentioned in your posts and threads here.
     
  3. Chip

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    Basically, there are a couple of practical choices:

    1. Stay on the medication, which appears to be working.

    2. Address the issues the medication is treating. The only way you can do that is with extended therapy, because it takes considerable time to repattern the dysfunctional neural pathways that the medication is treating.

    And there are impractical choices:

    3. Go off the medication entirely, by tapering, under a psychiatrist's direction. This will cause whatever symptoms you were treating to return.

    4. Simply stop taking the medication. This is ill advised, as it can have serious (and depending on medication and dosage) potentially life-threatening side effects, not to mention all of the issues under 3.

    A lot of people don't like the idea of going to therapy. But in your case, it's basically therapy or medication. Your psychiatrist is giving you good advice. If I were you, I'd follow it.
     
  4. emerry

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    And what is bad in therpy in your opinion?

    Let me reframe what Chip said in human language: therapy is an eye-opener if you need it. It gives you the opportunity to learn a lot and achieve your full potential. Those neural pathways are habits and experiences and conditioning you've been through, and if it's been wrong, you are given a chance to repair it, a second chance.
     
  5. merry

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    i don’t want to speak to anyone else’s experience, but i would like to share that i thiught therapy was hopeless.

    just to give you some background, i have suffered institutional abuse, due to the carelessness and misunderstanding of counselors/therapists/psychologists...

    after years of avoiding therapy all together i decided it was time to try again, and i must share, it is so important to find someone to work with, who you not only like, but truly feel is a good fit. you can like a person, and they can not be the counselor for you.

    on that note, i have to agree that staying on a medication regiment that works can be so super important. it may feel like you need an immediate change, but please know that the time taken to wean off of or get to a better dr before deciding what is right may serve you better than making a rash decision.

    please find jen gotch on instagram (not a personal friend and she has close to a million followers, huge mental health advocate)
    or check out her podcast JG is ok sometimes.

    she just had a great episode about medication and finding a good dr.

    best wishes in your journey.
     
    #5 merry, Aug 10, 2018
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018
  6. Mikey D

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    I stopped taking anti-depressants about 10 years ago. I don't think I ever felt dizzy, but there were a few days of general discomfort, or what I imagine a hangover might feel like (I don't drink alcohol, so I've never had a hangover). In recent years, I have noticed symptoms of depression and anxiety getting worse, especially in the past few months. Last week, I saw my doctor to get a new prescription. So far it seems to be working somewhat, but I have had some moderately bad side effects. I am seeing him again next week, so I might ask for a different medication.