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Gay Guys Make the Best Neighborhoods (Gayborhoods!)

Discussion in 'Chit Chat' started by Rakkaus, Feb 19, 2014.

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Do you live in a gayborhood? Do you want to?!

  1. I live in a gayborhood and I love it! :D :newcolor:

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  2. I live in a 'straight' neighborhood, but badly wish I lived in a gayborhood! :eusa_pray:newcolor:

    64.3%
  3. I live in a gayborhood but I hate it! :eusa_hand :dead:

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  4. I in a live 'straight' neighborhood, and I prefer it that way. :icon_eek: :dead:

    35.7%
  1. Rakkaus

    Rakkaus Guest

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    No, not neighbors, neighborhoods. (Though I'd like to thinks we make great neighbors too :grin:)

    'Gayborhoods' Have A Profound Sociological And Economic Effect On Urban Areas

    Recommend you watch the short (4:38) video at the link. Professor Janice Madden, Professor of Regional Science, Sociology, Urban Studies, and Real Estate at the University of Pennsylvania, examined 36 major metropolitan areas as part of her research into 'gayborhoods'.

    Basically the story is that neighborhoods where gay guys are concentrated tend to the hippest, liveliest, most diverse, most exciting places to live, the downtown of the city.

    Gay men move to poor, decrepit, inner-city urban neighborhoods, fix things up, improve the neighborhoods, make them nice places to live...and then of course all of a sudden straight people all want to live there too, causing property values to rise, essentially leading to gentrification. The rising prices of course force many of the gay guys who fixed the neighborhood up in the first place to have to move to yet another poor urban neighborhood to fix up and make liveable. It's a constant cycle, gay guys just keep turning poor crappy hellholes into beautiful places to live.

    So gay guys make the best neighborhoods! :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:ride:

    Interestingly, for lesbians it was found to be the opposite case, lesbians tend to live on the outskirts far from downtown, which Prof. Madden attributes to 2 factors: A) lesbians are more likely to have children and B) "The politics of lesbians are different than the politics of gay men".

    Personally I would very much like to live in a gayborhood if I ever could afford to, there are actually many gayborhoods here in New York City. Honestly there's just some magic in the air walking around holding hands with your boyfriend as you walk down the street in a lively, happening neighborhood where you feel like you belong.:newcolor:

    Walking down the street in Chelsea or the Village, I feel a connection to the many gay people I see around me, when I make eye contact with some of them, there's like a little signal between us like we're all bonded together and this is our gayborhood. (&&&)
     
  2. Fiddledeedee

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    What's the poll you said you wanted? If you tell me the options to put, I can make it for you. :slight_smile:
     
  3. Nikky DoUrden

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    Its like a sense of belonging, I guess, that make the place flurish.
    But I guess, that over time it won't work anywhere because any community will be "racist" inside itself and things will start to get ugly ?

    But ye I would love to live in a place like that, holding hands in the street is on my TODO list ^^

    But I also don't know if its the best idea because homophobes can do bad things to that neighberhood :/
     
  4. FireSmoke

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    :icon_bigg
     
  5. HuskyPup

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    That's definitely been the case here in Baltimore. I've lived in or on the fringes of the 'Gayborhood' since I arrived here some 16 years back. Mount Vernon was the 'original' gay neighborhood, and still is; lots of businesses, and still where the gay bars are, the LGBT center, and such, and a beautifully historic area. To the north, past the symphony hall and opera, you have Bolton Hill, a very pretty though more residential neighborhood, again, very much gay-gentrified, now more diverse, with amazing well preserved brownstones. The art college, MICA, is also there.

    Now things are pushing to the fringes of an adjoining area called 'Station North', around Penn Station, which I like. A bit more crumbly, but a nice mixture of the arts scene and gay friendly. What I like is being able to walk to places to see movies, bands, go to coffee shops, taverns, art openings...it may not be as bustling as NYC, but I've come to like the city's quirky charm.

    After all, we did give the world John Waters and Divine, and that says something about Charm City, as it's called.

    So I'd agree, and have seen the process of gays improving neighborhoods at work, spreading into areas that were once abandoned, and bringing about new life. Baltimore can be a rough town, and the LGBT community has been among the pioneering forces making it a safer place to live. (DC has has similar patterns, DuPont Circle having been the gay epicenter, but now priced way, way beyond comprehension)
     
    #5 HuskyPup, Feb 20, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014
  6. Andrew99

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    I would so live in a gayboorhood and we could all have rainbows for stop signs at would be fun and if we see strait people well tell them are neighborhood is a gayboorhood and we heterophobes lmao yes yes yes yes!!! :roflmao:
     
  7. Rakkaus

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    Yay the poll I had wanted has been added, courtesy of Alex2020, to get a better sense of what sort of places EC members are from, and what they think of gayborhoods. :icon_mrgr
     
  8. Rakkaus

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    Haha there actually are tons of rainbows all over gayborhoods.

    For example, the rainbow crosswalks in West Hollywood:

    [​IMG]


    And the rainbow pillar marking BoysTown in Chicago:

    [​IMG]

    Or the gigantic rainbow street art in Chelsea, NYC:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. SomethingWitty

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    I live in St. Louis just on the edge of the main gayborhood (central west end along manchester), unfortunately it's starting to get expensive. The brightside of living close to the bars and such is starting to grow on me, but unfortunately the rent is starting to cut down more seriously on how much of it I can enjoy. The weird part is that while the property values have gone up, a lot of the area is still crappy, of course, St. Louis being what it is, everywhere in the city (and county) not facing an important street is crappy.
     
  10. Im anonymous

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    LOVE IT!!! :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:ride: :newcolor:
     
  11. Sarcastic Luck

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    My nearest neighbor is a half mile away, so...No idea what to vote lol.
     
  12. Aussie792

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    I wouldn't want to live in one, but I understand they have their benefits. Unfortunately, because of the increased costs (I'm pretty sure most gay areas are gentrified or originally expensive) the people who need it most (LGBT people who've been kicked out of home or just don't have much money) aren't able to live in them.
     
  13. Andrew99

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    I'm so livin there

    ---------- Post added 22nd Feb 2014 at 01:01 AM ----------

    I friended u sarcastic luck
     
  14. Nikky DoUrden

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    whats the difference between 2 and 3 ? xD
    I voted 3 because I answer because I read everything. no time, no time, chop chop chop!
     
  15. Lilli

    Lilli Guest

    The Castro District is a perfect example of this in CA. Castro was a deteriorating area in northern CA and gay guys (mostly) came in and gussied it up!

    I'd love to move to a Gayborhood :newcolor:
     
  16. AlamoCity

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    I don't think I could ever move into a "gayborhood." Of course, if my only options were to live in a gayborhood or live in a hostile environment, I'd choose the former. There's just something about rainbows everywhere that doesn't appeal to me. Also, most gayborhoods tend to be in urban areas and I don't like congestion.
     
  17. Rakkaus

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    The "gay areas" aren't gentrified or "originally expensive", originally they are run-down inner-city urban neighborhoods that nobody wants to live in. Straight people who could afford to live elsewhere would not choose to live there. Being excluded from the mainstream of society, gay guys were the only ones willing to move into them, and once they did they improved the quality of life in the neighborhood dramatically.

    The gentrification happens because once gays make a previously run-down neighborhood into a liveable pleasant environment, all of a sudden straight people want to all move in there too. Gays have made urban neighborhoods appealing to middle and upper-class white straight people, who (at least in the U.S.) have been fleeing the cities for the suburbs since the 1950s. (One positive from this is at least we can begin to undo the environmentally unsustainable mess that is suburban sprawl as suburban whites move back into the cities, the negative comes at the cost to the neighborhood's original inhabitants, usually poor black or Hispanic residents, along with the gays)

    Of course all this new demand to live in the neighborhood means property costs increase, the cost of living there increases. And the character of the neighborhood changes.

    The gay artist who helped to make the neighborhood what it is is priced out of his own neighborhood, and his house is taken over by a wealthy straight stockbroker and his stay-at-home wife and nanny who take their 4 kids out in their strollers around the block every day. The character of the neighborhood changes, it loses its liveliness and edge as all these wealthy straight people moving in try to remake a 'family-friendly' suburban environment in what was previously an exciting gay urban gayborhood.

    Meanwhile the gay artist has to find another poor affordable neighborhood to move to and turn into a pretty neighborhood.
     
    #17 Rakkaus, Feb 22, 2014
    Last edited: Feb 22, 2014
  18. imnotreallysure

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    We have a gay district here, but it's an integral part of the larger downtown area, rather than a neigbourhood in its own right. It's mostly commercial too as opposed to residential, so not many people live there - mostly gay bars and stores selling sex toys and bondage. There are areas that have gentrified a lot over the past 20 years, but there isn't an obvious gay presence - they are probably there, but they're not shouting about it. They're just your typical 'poor people out, rich people in' neighbourhoods that are too expensive with a hint of pretension. Lots of hipsters and urban young professionals (who may or may not be gay).

    As for myself - I have no desire to live in a 'gayborhood' - I don't define myself by my sexuality, and I don't think congregating gay people into specific areas is even helpful to our cause - no more than different races or immigrant groups forming their own enclaves and never interacting with anyone else.
     
    #18 imnotreallysure, Feb 22, 2014
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  19. Rakkaus

    Rakkaus Guest

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    Uh you mean the poll options 2 and 3? They're complete opposites of each other:

    I live in a 'straight' neighborhood, but badly wish I lived in a gayborhood! :eusa_pray:newcolor:
    I live in a gayborhood but I hate it! :eusa_hand :dead:

    Option 2 means you DO NOT live in a gayborhood, but you WANT to live in a gayborhood.

    Option 3 means you DO live in a gayborhood, but you HATE living in a gayborhood.

    So you voted that you do live in a gayborhood, but you hate living in a gayborhood.


    But oh gosh I had wanted this to be a public poll, can any mod change it to a public poll so you can see who voted for what?
     
  20. Tightrope

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    None of the above 4 choices apply.

    I live in a predominately straight neighborhood and just like a lot of features about it: the way it looks and feels, the fact that I'm used to it, access to transit (various types), etc. Clearly, there are gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and other sexual minorities in the neighborhood, though most likely in some of the bigger apartment complexes, even though I'm sure there are some married men and women here and there who are not fully straight . I once recall seeing a bumper sticker that said "We are everywhere," but this bumper sticker is dated. On the residential street on which I grew up, there was a single guy who would have made the Top 3 for best kept home and landscaping. At the time, I only saw that this guy was really handsome and not married, but didn't think much of it. Now, I can sort of do the math, thought it's really not relevant. A gayborhood would be sensory overload for some, including some of our members. I like trees, winding streets, less density, and most gayborhoods tend to be in the urban core. In most big cities, the suburbs are far from hostile or negative any more. Also, if going to a restaurant or shop in a gayborhood, the vibe that a lot of people are in cruise mode is also switched on ... not for everyone, but for a good number of people. I didn't even care for that 24/7 aspect when I was in my 20s.